2016 Scholarship Recipient

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The Lisa Michelle Memorial Fund is pleased to announce the recipient of our 2016 scholarship. This scholarship fund was established to recognize and assist students who have lost a parent to substance abuse. This applicant’s story stood out among the rest and we are proud to award $1,000 to assist in her academic journey.

2016 Scholarship Recipient

Micole Fuller, Washington State University

“I think the essence of [this scholarship] foundation is something I have a lot of respect for and understanding of. While dealing with my father’s death, his mental illness, and especially his alcohol abuse for 20 years was an extremely hard part of my life, I do appreciate the opportunity that even this application has given me to reconcile with the past and honor the fact that—despite the hardships in his life—he was a good man who wanted nothing more than to be there for his children. Even if I’m not given the award, I have a lot of admiration for its purpose and am glad that a deserving student who has faced things I am all too familiar with will be given this academic opportunity.”

Get to Know Micole Fuller

Micole Fuller - photograph 2Q: Tell us a bit about yourself.

My name is Micole McCarthy Fuller, I’m 26, I LOVE to travel, and am ecstatic to have finally returned to college to obtain my BA in Anthropology. I am so very honored and grateful to have been awarded this scholarship from the Lisa Michelle Memorial Fund. I have a great passion for cultural studies and am excited to be pursuing an education and career that I love, and that will allow me to assist and support communities foreign to my own.

Q: Imagine yourself 10 years from now. What goals and ambitions do you have for yourself, personally, academically, and professionally?

Within the next 10 years, I hope to receive my doctorate in Cultural Anthropology or Archaeology, focusing on Native North American Studies or Scandinavian Studies. For the latter concentration, I would love to live in Norway for at least a year or two to study the impact of arts and religion from Norse history in modern day society. Later in life, I would like to perhaps work as a museum curator, lending my knowledge to cultural and academic education, and to protect and promote the beauty of a peoples’ culture.

On a more personal (and I suppose professional) level, I would like to continue traveling around the world. I think that every person, especially young people, should do whatever they can to travel, even if it is just within their own country. It is very eye-opening to explore cultures that are different from your own, for it helps you realize that there is not only one way to live a good and fulfilled life.

Q: Aside from a college degree, what do you hope to gain from your college experience?

I think one of the best things about college is the interaction you have with not only trained and passionate educators, but also with fellow students who share your thirst for knowledge! I have had so many interesting and insightful conversations, and even debates, with other students who share or disagree with myself regarding the topic at hand. You can learn a lot from other students, not only about the topic and their views on such, but about your own opinions and thought processes as well. I hope to gain more of this knowledge and self-awareness from this experience!

Q: What motivates you to continue working towards accomplishing your goals?

I find my primary motivation comes from the unwavering support I receive from my mother and her hopes that I will accomplish my goals. As a single mother, I have watched her give everything she had to support her children, and I only hope to make her proud by accomplishing my goals and experiencing a vivacious and well-rounded life… One which I could share with her.

Q: What advice would you give to other student who have been through circumstances similar to yours?

My advice would be to try not to lose sight of who you are in the emotional turmoil of family and life. It can be easy to forget such things when someone you love has lost themselves to substance abuse, as you tend to get caught up in their problems and identity crisis, and from the guilt you may feel when you can’t seem to help them find their way. But you have to remember that you can only help someone who wants to help themselves, and that your identity is just as important as helping others find and maintain their own. Indeed, it is far easier to help others when you have the confidence and sense of self to support your desire to reach out to them. It is far more difficult to help someone (re)gain their identity and find the right path when you’re still questioning your own identity.

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